Facts about the course

Study points:
7.5
Responsible department:
Faculty of Business Administration and Social Sciences
Course Leader:
Alexander Krumer
Lecture Semester:
Spring, Autumn
Teaching language:
English
Duration:
½ year

IDR720 Introduction to Sport and Event Economics (Spring 2020)

About the course

  • Supply and demand
  • Market equilibrium
  • Value of money and capitalisation
  • Game theory
  • Incentives in tournaments
  • Empirical analysis
  • Home advantage phenomenon
  • Hosting of mega events
  • Behavioral aspects in sports competitions
  • Gender issues in sports
  • Competitive balance

The course is connected to the following study programs

Recommended requirements

Basic knowledge in math, statistics and micro economics.

The student's learning outcomes after completing the course

Knowledge:

Completing this course the student should be able to:

  • Understand basic theories that are used in Sports Economics
  • Understand the economic issues related to team sports and the hosting of major events.
  • Understand the goals of the designer of a sport tournament.

Skills:

Completing this course the student should be able to:

  • Analyze the factors and mechanisms that influence the allocation of efforts of contestants in tournaments.
  • Execute theoretical analysis and predict different outcomes that may be of interest for the designer of a sport tournament. 
  • Work with data and execute empirical analysis.

General Competence:

Completing this course the student should be able to:

  • Apply different Sports Economics principles in future engagements in sports organisations.

 

 

Forms of teaching and learning

There will be usual lectures as well as sessions where students will learn a statistical software Stata. At the end of the course the students will also present one paper and empirical work based on data from real competitions.

Examination

  • Form of assessment: Written school assessment
  • Proportion: 70%
  • Duration: 2 Hours
  • Grouping: Individual
  • Grading scale: Letter (A - F)
  • Support material: Calculator with empty memory + general dictionary in mother tongue/Norwegian/English in paper version
  • Form of assessment: Oral school assessment
  • Proportion: 15%
  • Duration: 20 Minutes
  • Grouping: Group
  • Grading scale: Letter (A - F)
  • Support material: -
  • Form of assessment: Oral school assessment
  • Proportion: 15%
  • Duration: 20 Minutes
  • Grouping: Group
  • Grading scale: Letter (A - F)
  • Support material: -

Syllabus

Relevant litterature that will include among others the following academic references:

  • Fort, Rodney D. 2011. Sports Economics. 3 rd edition. Prentice Hall
  • Szymanski, S., 2003. The economic design of sporting contests. Journal of Economic Literature, 41(4), pp.1137-1187.

  • Kahn, L.M., 2000. The sports business as a labor market laboratory. The Journal of Economic Perspectives, 14(3), pp.75-94.

  • Berger, J. and Pope, D., 2011. Can losing lead to winning?. Management Science, 57(5), pp.817-827.

  • Brown, J., 2011. Quitters never win: The (adverse) incentive effects of competing with superstars. Journal of Political Economy, 119(5), pp.982-1013.

  • Malueg, D.A. and Yates, A.J., 2010. Testing contest theory: evidence from best-of-three tennis matches. The Review of Economics and Statistics, 92(3), pp.689-692.

  • Cohen-Zada, D., Krumer, A. and Shtudiner, Z., 2017. Psychological momentum and gender. Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 135, pp.66-81.

  • Elaad, G., Krumer, A. and Kantor, J., 2018. Corruption and Sensitive Soccer Games: Cross-Country Evidence. The Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization34(3), pp.364-394.

 

Last updated from FS (Common Student System) Nov. 20, 2019 12:30:46 AM